Monday, May 19, 2008

Jared Reviews Planet of the Ood!

(Note, parts of the following have been written weeks ago)


Ood News Week

Yesterday I was told to update my blog. Well, I guess I'd better do it.

I've been putting it of because when I watched Planet of the Ood I was too keen to actually stop it every three seconds and write down a sarky comment, so I have no review. Which means I have to review it the old-fashioned way.

Planet of the Ood, were it not for the Master trilogy last year, would probably be my favourite of the New Series so far. It isn't so much a tremendously brilliant story, or a wonderfully conceived and constructed plot. Even Graeme Harper's direction, solid as always and with the lingering bite that he likes to work with, isn't amazing. I like this episode becuase it says that nothing's changed: Doctor Who can still do anything.

Every review of this story mentions The Caves of Androzani, the single most popular DW story ever (up yours, Pyramids!) and one that would have won such a plaudit even were it not for the apparent paucity of brassiers in the wardrobe department, and this cannot be coincidence as sensible readers will know.

Ood has a completely different plot: Androzani is about political manipulations of war for its own sake. Ood is about slavery. There's no common ground there. But the tone, that's the matter.

Androzani was such a runaway success that for most of the next season of stories, the script editor who had been stunned to find the spun gold that landed in his lap tried to emulate that tone in almost all of his stories. (The exceptions being Mark of the Rani, a script he didn't even edit on principle of being an arsehole, and Timelash, a script he tried desperately just to make watchable. (He failed)) The sad thing was that a lot of the joy of the experience came with context - Androzani was devised as Davison's swansong and the darkness was used with a purpose. In most of Season 22 the darkness was simply a universal fact rather than anything meaningful, serving only to create the obfuscation of morals that destroyed the show for many. (The coat didn't help either of course)

Planet of the Ood is a landmark effort for being the second story to use this tone and actually WORK. Not even Holmes' previous attempt - The Power of Kroll - had been successful. (Though I love it) But Ood manages either to get the balance between DW and "awww man the future sucks" just right, or comes in at the right time in the series.


Oodunnit?

Eerily similar to Revelation of the Daleks, the egregiously over-rated story that barely features either the Doctor OR Daleks, Ood opens with the Doctor and his companion finding a dying monster that tries (fairly pitifully) to kill them, but the two become more concerned about what has happened to it and how to (posthumously) help it. I have to say that "The circle must be broken" is a nice and creepy phrase to be repeated ad nauseum through a story. Just the right blend between cryptic. ALSO like Revelation of the Daleks the story involves a recurring alien, a sleazy industry built around said aliens, a creep who is amazingly insecure about hair loss, morally bankrupt characters, a near complete death toll, and a snow-covered planet.

Once again, I'm picking up a Season 22 vibe..


Ood, Where's my Morality?

The story has a lot to say about morality, and was quite a pleasant surprise to me. As Lawrence Miles points out, it's one of the strongest moments in the series when the Doctor points out that the slavery of the Ood isn't that different to the Asian sweatshops upon which modern humanity relies. Of course, he sees that this moment is squandered, but it's understandable that Donna's pissed off at the Doctor's ever 'high-and-mighty' attitude... especially given that the first day they met he drowning sapient children to death. And the point is well made - unlike similar attempts at parallels (such as the virus asking Dave Lister whether killing him is any different than he eating a vindaloo - erm, yes, because he didn't actually kill it. But I digress from this digression...) it doesn't suggest that one is exactly like the other, simply a point from which the eventuality may grow.

As often happens in DW (the best ones at least) it isn't so much about immorality as amorality, with the slavers simply not caring, rather than having any ill intent. Although we may loathe Tim McInnerney's character, it is in no way because he is evil. It's because he's despisable and, more importantly, the type of person we know all too well. Similarly, the Indian PR lady (you can tell that I've watched this recently, can't you?) doesn't have an evil bone in her body. It's even possible that she's trying to be nice. But through the business that she is representing and the fact that she doesn't care about any of it, and is ultimately quite affronting in her cowardice. It's no surprise that we aren't phased by their deaths... indeed, it somehow seems like the final bloodbath is some divine act of retribution rather than any form of tragedy..

Ya Zarking Ood!

There is a possible exception to this: token rebel character - who is, according to some OGer, the father of Ron in Harry Potter and therefore also Olaf Petersson from Red Dwarf - but we don't really get to know the guy. And even though he's a self-proclaimed 'Friend of the Ood', it's noteworthy that Ood Sigma seems remarkably unphased at his death..

The other exception, is of course, Security Chief Mr Psychopathic Killing Machine McGee. Who IS fucking nuts. I have to say I loved this guy, as not since... hmm, let's see... Season 22? Have we seen a good old-fashioned psychopath come up against the Doctor. And given the somewhat tame direction of the show at the moment I thought we'd never see his ilk again. But we have.

The scene where he tries to crush the Doctor with his crane and seems to be on the verge of orgasm throughout the entire process is remarkable in it's disturbing nature. Another brilliant moment where the Doctor only survives through dumb luck, showing, not for the first time, that when his genius for self-preservation is met with an equal ingenuity for killing in new and inventive ways the Doctor is fucked.

What is really remarkable, though, is that after Security Dude decides to gas unarmed opponents en masse (Just like Commander Gustave Lytton. Hmm, what season did he appear in?), the Ood find him and.. don't kill him. After killing everyone that they've met through their translator orbs (which, it has to be said, does not seem like a painless death) they break this pattern especially for this dude and instead steal his gasmask, beat him up, throw him behind the cage, lock it, and let the gas vent on schedule. That is a lot of effort to go to, especially when currently rabid in anger.

In short: don't fuck with the Ood.

Magic - the Oodini brand!

The entire episode is a triumph of every department of BBC Wales... the prosphetics are brilliant, with the Ood showing a remarkable versatility of expression, the alien planet is convincing (Yes! IT WORKED, damn you!), Graeme Harper, as usual, kicks everyone's arse like some sort of specially engineered Posterminator. One aspect for me triumphed above all others: the sound design.

Yeah, I know that's a geektastic thing to be saying.. but then I am a guy who has a movie game of 'spot the Wilhelm Scream'. And the Ood Song in this story is a remarkable piece of soundwork. Oh, man. That bit where the Doctor lets Donna hear it... it's one of the few bits in the New Series that actually brings me near to tears. Yes. Few. I'm not one of those wet, sop Americans how thinks that getting a fat bloke to scream "OI CAN CARRY YOOOOU!" in a terrible West Country accent while the London Symphony Orchestra attempts to perforate my eardrums counts as subtle, heartbreaking cinema and so blubbers like General Carnage seeing an Olsen Twins movie. But a moment so beautiful, simplistic and understated that manages to pull off the microcosm effect that DW, as a necessity, needs to strive for in the modern day and communicates the plight of an entire race with absolute effectiveness.

Another triumph for the show is prosphetic work. As in prosphetic work to make you go "HOLY SHIT HOW DID THAT GET PAST THE CENSORS I THINK I'M GONNA BE SICK!"

Somehow I think that will become quite a notorious moment for young children everywhere...

Hornblower and The Oodsphere... no wait, that doesn't work...

Hmm. 'Oodsphere' does not sound like 'Hotspur' at all, it's true..

Anyway, that about wraps up my review of Planet of the Ood, the longest in the coming since the last one. And the reason it's taken so long, other than abject apathy and laziness on my own part and the fact that May seems to traditionally be a slow month for our blogs for some reason, is because this is a very good episode. The only possible crack showing is that the Doctor and Donna don't really contribute that much to the plot (again, like Season 22!) in the ultimate sense, but then (UNlike Season 22) they are still the central focal point for the entire story. We see everything through their eyes, learn things as they learn them, and go on the same journey as they have. And we learn learn a bit about them both.

In terms of subtelty of writing, general tone, design... screw it, in terms of EVERYTHING this is right up there with the best of the New Series... or, even though I like to avoid superlatives as I do Indian blokes on the phone who start a conversation with "Hello my name is Jim I am calling you from Sydney.." ... as one of the best from the Series full stop.

9/10



What Those Other Losers Thought...

IMDBer Response - I could of sworn Donna said somthing along the lines of,
"I was born above a 'Paki shop'".
You can't say that on the BBC in this day of age!!

(Jared says: The day of age is OVER, this is day or orc!")

Paraphrased Lawrence Miles Response: TV now is different now than it was twenty years ago. Fuck. YOU WANNA FIGHT ME, MOFFAT? Also, I didn't really watch this one.

OGer Response: Hey, Blake's 7 is back..!

Meh...

(Jared says: Excitement is pretty short-lived on the internet...)

Keith Topping Response: Wasn't too sure what to expect from this one but that was really rather good. Nicely pitched midway between the humour of the first episode and the drama of the second.

Quite an old fashioned Doctor Who story in many ways (installation setting, very Troughton, the aliens, somewhat Hinchcliffe) with a nice moral at it's core. Beautifully directed too. 4

(Jared says: And he STILL only gives it 4%? Blow me, he's a harsh judge!)

Randomly Chosen Racist's Response: Although seeing as the story focused on slavery, I found the choice of actor interesting. Maybe I'm reading too much into it, but it suggested to me that the wheel keeps turning, and those who were once enslaved can easily become the enslavers if they aren't careful, and that the treatment of the Ood was the same as the treatment of African slaves.

(Jared says: Mein Gott, you are right... you ARE reading too much into this)

Spara's Baffling Response: That was a very good episode and one reason for this was the return to the strong ethical dimension of the Pertwee years. The story didn't shirk from exposing and condemning the human capacity for exploiting and enslaving, as exemplified by the Doctor's comment about how Donna's clothes were made.At the same time the Ood's revenge and Donna's comment about not knowing what was right made the ethical aspects believable rather than dogmatic.

(Jared says: Yeah, I know, it's actually pretty normal. But the fact that it has come from Spara, ironically, still makes it baffling...)

Eye of Horus Response: N/A. Still none. I've gone two weeks without posting ANYTHING and I'm still ahead of these guys. Good to see that they;ve got a Lalla Ward interview on the frontpage of their site, though. From 1983. Woo. That upcoming anniversary special sounds crunking!



Next Week Trailer Oh my word, Martha's in next week, how astonishingly unexpected and unforewarned... lights going off in what seems to be a hospital corridor, wow, we've never seen that before... the cook from Hornblower left the navy and achieved immortality, but over the past 200 years has only managed to obtain a colonelcy in the army - no fist... Lindsay Lohan borrows Martha's car for 12 seconds... UNIT strangely enough have decided the best way to improve their public image is to base their new uniforms on V For Vendetta... whoah, Sontarans, how unexpected... Holy shit, Christopher Ryan can sort of do another voice... he also seems to have been studying at Hogwarts in his spare time going by that wand he's waving around... and those new Sontaran uniforms are still kind of Mardis-Gras. What happened to the crushed black leather look? ... hang on, that's not a proper Sontaran ship! Man, the next review is going to be one long fanboy bitch from me... once again, a companion makes the rather paranoid assumption that the Doctor has a set secret agenda he works to with all companions. For a change, though, it doesn't involve sex. Yet... I keep hitting the stop button in Windows Media Player instead of the play button forcing me to watch this shit like two dozen times to type this up... UNIT don't know who the Sontarans are? Oh, that's fine, that's just three billion things that now aren't canon... "STARE INTO THE FACE OF DEATH!" - erm, no.

Yeah, strap yourselves in from some bitching, kids. I get a feeling I'm going to be an arsehole about this one.

10 comments:

Youth of Australia said...

Brilliant! Superlative overload!

(Did you find blogger playing up this morning? I had a self-pitying emo post ready to put up but no single site would load! Not even Spara's... he's deleted most of our comments, you know...)

I agree of course, and you define what went wrong with Season 22 so well I weep. Weep like a captive Ood. Maybe you can explain why Season 7 of Red Dwarf sucks big time...

And no way is Dr, um... does he have a name? FOTO dude. No way is he Peterson. I would have twigged instantly. And Sigma's lack of response to the death I forgive as a) Ood are, generally speaking inscrutable unless their eyes are glowing red and foaming at the tendrils and b) he was trying to save the Doctor and Donna.

And "Don't Fuck With The Ood" made me laugh to the point of having an athsma attack, and might change the spoof title. Brilliant.

I don't recall any line from Donna - and even if it's there, it's probably "packing shop". Mad Larry would be a lot easier to bear if he cut to the chase like that (oh, and his huge rant of "Agathe Christie is actually shit and totally unbelievable that the Doctor would need her help" is a waste of time - the murderer is Edward-Grove-style copying Christie; she is, therefore, the only person who can work out what they're up to! I might be shithouse, but if you needed to predict the actions of Dave Restal, I'd STILL be the person to talk to...) Was Kieth Topping giving marks out of 5 or marks out of 100?

There are a million puny defences for the issues you have in the next time trailer, but I won't waste time. Good review. Review mighty, review strong, review rocks!

Jared "No Nickname" Hansen said...

Maybe you can explain why Season 7 of Red Dwarf sucks big time...

No Rimmer. Without Rimmer the established dynamic that the series has used as a crutch since DAY FRIGGING ONE is gone in an instant. In a brain-destroying twist they decide to bring in Kochanski (okay, not all their fault as they were under pressure to bring in a woman) and COMPLETELY CHANGE THE CHARACTER to make her some sort of surrogate Rimmer.

This is fruitless because

a) She could never be anywhere near as bad as Rimmer for credibility reasons given that Lister was in love with her and for the simple fact that NOBODY can be as bad as Rimmer.

b) The fact that it's Kochanski leaves Lister constantly muzzled in response because he's ever hopeful to get in her pants, so the Rimmer-Lister dynamic is only halfway recreated anyway.

c) Because the Rimmer character is now a woman it adds a rather uncomfortable sexual powerplay element that messes with the established premise of 'four normal guys dealing with weird space stuff'. It also makes Kochanski even less likeable because her rivalry is directed at all the males, adding a 'feminazi' feel to her character.

The episodes of Season 7 that I thought worked were Tikka to Ride (Regular Dwarf supersized), Beyond a Joke (Kryten is the focus) and the virus one. Note they all are missing the 'Kochanski as new Rimmer' dynamic, and the 'serious' storytelling that seemed to be adopted to try and hide their shortcomings.

Although Season 8 is massively unpopular, I love it because it brings Rimmsy back AND lets Kochanski mellow out to the point where she actually does bring a new element to the crew. (The way she can talk to Kryten on his own level especially, creating quite a nice double act)

And no way is Dr, um... does he have a name? FOTO dude. No way is he Peterson. I would have twigged instantly.

Yeah, that's what I thought... wiki'ing...

Ah. He plays James Potter. The guy with no dialogue who we only see in photos. How could I not know?!

I don't recall any line from Donna - and even if it's there, it's probably "packing shop".

It was actually right near the start, when she says... wait for it... 'package tours'

That's quite a mis-hearing, I have to say.

Was Kieth Topping giving marks out of 5 or marks out of 100?

Yeah, it was 5. I was just being a smartarse.

Youth of Australia said...

No Rimmer. Without Rimmer the established dynamic that the series has used as a crutch since DAY FRIGGING ONE is gone in an instant. In a brain-destroying twist they decide to bring in Kochanski (okay, not all their fault as they were under pressure to bring in a woman) and COMPLETELY CHANGE THE CHARACTER to make her some sort of surrogate Rimmer.
Yeah, but it's something else. The way the plots die before they've started, the way the jokes are unfunny, the retarded continuity, the sheer... lack of any reason to LIKE people. Plus the way they can travel through time and space and other universes. But don't.

This is fruitless because
a) She could never be anywhere near as bad as Rimmer for credibility reasons given that Lister was in love with her and for the simple fact that NOBODY can be as bad as Rimmer.
b) The fact that it's Kochanski leaves Lister constantly muzzled in response because he's ever hopeful to get in her pants, so the Rimmer-Lister dynamic is only halfway recreated anyway.
c) Because the Rimmer character is now a woman it adds a rather uncomfortable sexual powerplay element that messes with the established premise of 'four normal guys dealing with weird space stuff'. It also makes Kochanski even less likeable because her rivalry is directed at all the males, adding a 'feminazi' feel to her character.

She didn't bring out anything interesting in Kryten, either. It was much better in Series 8 where they were a Holmesian double act...

The episodes of Season 7 that I thought worked were Tikka to Ride (Regular Dwarf supersized), Beyond a Joke (Kryten is the focus) and the virus one. Note they all are missing the 'Kochanski as new Rimmer' dynamic, and the 'serious' storytelling that seemed to be adopted to try and hide their shortcomings.
I liked the bits of Nanarchy with Holly in it. Oh, and Blue.

Although Season 8 is massively unpopular, I love it because it brings Rimmsy back AND lets Kochanski mellow out to the point where she actually does bring a new element to the crew. (The way she can talk to Kryten on his own level especially, creating quite a nice double act)
Exactly! And I dunno why people hate it - at the time, no one I met was in any way thinking it was short of utter brilliance. Kill Crazy deserved to join the show full time - he managed to relate to all of them, and he's a walking plot device.

"LET'S GO KILL SOMETHING! YEEEAAAH!" /knocks himself unconscious on the door, everyone walks over him/

Why couldn't Torchwood have a guy like him in it...

Yeah, that's what I thought... wiki'ing...
Ah. He plays James Potter. The guy with no dialogue who we only see in photos. How could I not know?!

Oh. Kay.

It was actually right near the start, when she says... wait for it... 'package tours'
Well, as she would say, DURR!

Yeah, it was 5. I was just being a smartarse.
I honestly didn't twig.

Jared "No Nickname" Hansen said...

Yeah, but it's something else. The way the plots die before they've started, the way the jokes are unfunny, the retarded continuity, the sheer... lack of any reason to LIKE people.

...yeah, I know. It would be easy to suggest that it's the absence of Rob Grant that does it all, but having read Doug Naylors The Last Human I don't think that's it. Maybe there was production difficulties added onto it? There did seem to be an odd focus on showing off their production values especially.

Just thinking, Stoke Me a Clipper illustrated that a lot. The elements of the episode should make it an instant classic. VR console shenannigans? Ace Rimmer? Arnsy becoming Ace? But... somehow it takes itself seriously. Which is really impressive for an episode that opens with Chris Barrie surfing on a crocodile to rescue a princess from a Nazi firing squad.

Plus the way they can travel through time and space and other universes. But don't.

...that is something I hadn't even thought about until you pointed it out just then... Jesus. Lost oppurtunity or what?

Mind you, the REASON it never occurred to me is because I think I've only seen Oroubourous twice. What a load of Star Trek-style WANK.

I liked the bits of Nanarchy with Holly in it. Oh, and Blue.


Isn't it remarkable how the show increases tenfold the very instant Norman Lovett opens his mouth?

Blue... I dunno, I remember it more as a collection of amusing little skits about Rimmer than a proper story. It seemed to show up how much the show NEEDED him than anything else. And the ending depressed me, where Lister shouted his head off that he never wanted to see him again, because the audience wants the exact OPPOSITE.

But, yes, it has more laughs than most other episodes.

And I dunno why people hate it - at the time, no one I met was in any way thinking it was short of utter brilliance.

Same here. We all thought it was piss-funny and as simple as that. I wonder if it's just the internet 'fans' who really hate it...

Kill Crazy deserved to join the show full time - he managed to relate to all of them, and he's a walking plot device.

I loved Kill Crazy. And Hollister. AND Ackerman. I was pleasantly surprised to find out that what RD needed after all those years was support characters...

Mind you... did they ever explain why there weren't two Christine Kochanskis onboard?

Youth of Australia said...

...yeah, I know. It would be easy to suggest that it's the absence of Rob Grant that does it all, but having read Doug Naylors The Last Human I don't think that's it. Maybe there was production difficulties added onto it? There did seem to be an odd focus on showing off their production values especially.
Paul Alexander wrote a lot of it, which might be the cause. Not so much "lack of good" but "presence of bad". The Parrallel Universes? Enough said. I mean, they have the equivalent of YOA standing in front of a mirror saying, "Huh, parallel universe" and walking off. Odd ideas, no actual STORY.

Just thinking, Stoke Me a Clipper illustrated that a lot. The elements of the episode should make it an instant classic. VR console shenannigans? Ace Rimmer? Arnsy becoming Ace? But... somehow it takes itself seriously. Which is really impressive for an episode that opens with Chris Barrie surfing on a crocodile to rescue a princess from a Nazi firing squad.
I tell you what it is - the rehashed plots. Look at SMAC, the whole opening bit in VR is the EXACT SAME joke as in Gunmen of the Apocalypse. Or the Deep Sleep stuff in Nanarchy. The pointless opening bits to Blue... Duct Soup, THERE was an object lesson in "right idea, wrong method".

...that is something I hadn't even thought about until you pointed it out just then... Jesus. Lost oppurtunity or what?
And don't think that they left their time-space machine behind in Tikka to Ride, as they use it easily in Ouroboros.

Mind you, the REASON it never occurred to me is because I think I've only seen Oroubourous twice. What a load of Star Trek-style WANK.
Yeah. Did anyone remember that "Lister's origin" was a drunken self-pitying party anecdote created SOLELY so the others could take the piss? Oh, and the JOKES! "He was thicker than a ticker-teller's wad"! That made me laugh... with disgust when this is supposed to be in the future - remember all the early eps where they REMEMBERED that.

Isn't it remarkable how the show increases tenfold the very instant Norman Lovett opens his mouth?
I know. I admit the "name famous one-armed people" scene was amusing, but could have been funnier. And the nanobots... how come they haven't taken over the universe?

Blue... I dunno, I remember it more as a collection of amusing little skits about Rimmer than a proper story. It seemed to show up how much the show NEEDED him than anything else. And the ending depressed me, where Lister shouted his head off that he never wanted to see him again, because the audience wants the exact OPPOSITE.
The same episode says they can travel to different dimensions in Starbug... why didn't they just LOOK for Rimmer?! Or have Rimmer arrive totally by accident? And I can't believe Rimmer's diaries were so warped; the gag was he gave a positive slant to the grim truth. The reconstructions should have had everyone ignoring his sage advice and getting into trouble, or - like Kochanski suggests - him calmly putting up with Lister's pranks...

But, yes, it has more laughs than most other episodes.
My dad must remember it, as he suggested the golf ball scene be done with a Sontaran that accidentally kills itself...

Same here. We all thought it was piss-funny and as simple as that. I wonder if it's just the internet 'fans' who really hate it...
I admit there is a tad dodgy moment when they all dress up like Duane Dibbley, (the whole relevance of that is never explained to the audience) but it works because it's PROOF they're not in reality.

I loved Kill Crazy. And Hollister. AND Ackerman. I was pleasantly surprised to find out that what RD needed after all those years was support characters...
And they got the whole 'leave Lister and Rimmer in each other's company' comedy gold. At the end, they were almost friends with their pranks and stuff.

Who can look at "I was just saying how much I hate you sir and that virus I used has had no side effect whatsoARGHHWHWEHJHREJ" and NOT say "comedy genius".

Mind you... did they ever explain why there weren't two Christine Kochanskis onboard?
Not on screen. In the script book, he says the nanobots knew there would be two Kochanskis, but basically it's a half-hearted retcon - Kochanski never really talks about being stuck in a different universe, and no one notices she looks different. Hell, the series starts with her having long blonde hair when the last one had it short and dark.

Season 7 is considered by the makers of Red Dwarf the same way RTD and Chibnall think of Torchwood 1. Not something to mention if it can be avoided.

Jared "No Nickname" Hansen said...

Season 7 is considered by the makers of Red Dwarf the same way RTD and Chibnall think of Torchwood 1. Not something to mention if it can be avoided.

Ah, good. Nice to see I'm not alone in that regard. In our household, certainly, we pretend it never happened.

Off to bed now.

Cameron Mason said...

I think a lot of the hate for Red Dwarf Series 8 boils down to:

- Expanding out Back in the Red to three parts due to the ammount of story crammed in, and to cover the budget required for the Blue Midget dance sequence

- Expanding Pete to a two part story so that the costs of the dinosaur were covered

- Not using the originaly recorded ending for Only the Good... and ending the series on a lame cliffhanger

Cameron

Jared "No Nickname" Hansen said...

- Expanding out Back in the Red to three parts due to the ammount of story crammed in, and to cover the budget required for the Blue Midget dance sequence

- Expanding Pete to a two part story so that the costs of the dinosaur were covered


Perhaps... but both of those episodes are AWESOME. Well, maybe not awesome but really, really funny.

Not using the originaly recorded ending for Only the Good... and ending the series on a lame cliffhanger

Huh. Never even heard that there WAS an original ending. I must admit that Only the Good was the one episode that felt like it SHOULD have been a two-parter (There isn't even a scene where the main characters learn about the pod, for crying out loud! And half the running time is taken up with The Cat trying to get beaten up...)

Cameron Mason said...

Huh. Never even heard that there WAS an original ending.

It's only on the Season 8 DVD release.

Rimmer comes back out of the mirrorverse with the cure, except the name changes to that of the cause due to the trip, so he then spends two minutes hopping back and forth in order to remember the name of the chemical.

When he tells the others the name, they all bag hin out over how simple it is to remember - even the Cat knows it.

They disperse the chemical and the ship is saved.

Cat, Lister and Kochanski conga as Kryten irons Rimmer's uniform.

As Red Dwarf passes the flotilla of Starbugs and Blue Midgets, Rimmer gives Captain Hollister the Rimmer salute.

It ends with the drink dispenser giving it's "Every dog has its day" speech and knocking Rimmer unconsious with a can.

Cameron

Youth of Australia said...

You COULD have just said it was on the DVD... SPOILER!!!!!!